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August 22 12:33 PM
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Alewives are an invasive species


Dear Woods-N-Water News:

The DNR guys are a laugh a minute, but this isn't funny anymore. I just got the new "MDNR Asian Carp" brochure at the bait shop. On the back it lists the Alewives as a common Michigan species, a common minnow, this implies alewives are native fish?

Alewives are first, last and always an invasive species, alewives main food is Zooplankton, and they eat larval native fish. There is no such thing as a naturalized invasive species. There is no such thing as a "Safe Level" of any invasive species, they all started with just a few. How many is less than a few?

The experts say all invasive species thrive from "lack of predators." This doesn't mean we don't have any. This means we are "lacking" enough to control the invasive species. Please understand, in order to save the alewives, the lakes have to stay in "lack of predators" mode forever! We can never not have an invasive species problem ever! We have to literally sacrifice the entire natural ecosystem just to protect the alewives, an invasive species! By keeping the lakes safe for the alewives, you are making the lakes safe for all invasive species, you protect one you protect them all, and this will include the Asian carp.

A high native/natural fish population makes an ecosystem more resistant to invasive species. A high invasive species population, makes a system more resistant to native fish. Why do we have to argue this point?

We have an invasive species problem, by protecting and intentionally increasing alewives, we are not moving forward to a solution. We are going backwards and increasing our invasive species problem! It appears we need to find a biologist that knows the difference between an invasive species and a native fish!

The DNR states in their Asian carp plan, they're committed to ecosystem management. Which; one that is invasive friendly, or one that is not?

A fishery that's dependent on an invasive species to survive (alewives) is not too big to fail. The Great Lakes natural ecosystem is too big to allow it to fail!

Tom Matych

Twin Lake MI


January 26, 2011

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